Needed: A focus on teaching and learning

The success of any 1-1 implementation lies less in the choice of computing device, but more in the difference that it can contribute to the overall teaching and learning that is taking place in the classroom. This is so important to remember, especially as more and more schools follow through with an “iPad initiative.”

While the selection of educational apps is vast (the Apple in Education website currently reads “Thousands of apps. Endless potential.”), I have come to understand that teachers shouldn’t focus only on the apps that can help with learning (intriguing as they may be). The key is to expand student thinking, not restrict it by working only within a choice selection of apps.

Appropriate instructional decisions are needed in order to take student learning to the next level. How are teachers challenging student thinking and inviting them to use their device in productive ways that will help them learn better? To what extent are students using the technology to curate their knowledge, collaborate with others, and create their own content? These are two important questions to keep in mind before deciding on an “app for that.”

The “flipped” classroom

The notion of a “flipped” classroom has been gaining a lot of attention in the past year or so.

First of all, what is a “flipped” classroom? By most accounts, a flipped classroom is one where the instruction takes place online outside of class hours, thereby freeing classtime for discussion, application and/or homework on the online lesson’s ideas and topics that students have previously viewed.

I have been following the development and interest that it is gaining and wanted to collect a number of links to some valuable resources on the flipped model:

This infographic provides a nice overview of the flipped model.

A collection of 10 reasons to consider flipping a classroom countered with 5 reasons not to flip a classroom.

A balanced commentary on the flipped classroom model for learning.

The flipped class manifest outlines the core tenets of a flipped classroom.

A discussion on how the flipped classroom is radically transforming learning.

The Flipped Class Network is a professional learning community to support teachers as they consider flipping a lesson or even their entire class.

The Vancouver Symposium on Christian Education – Day 2

This was a good first day for the ‘official’ symposium. By the time I was back at the condo, I was both tired and rejuvenated from the interactions of the day. Each session was worth my attention and focus. I think this was why I felt so exhausted by the time I left the discussion center! Rather than address each session directly today, my biggest take-away was the realization we are actually talking about my daughter’s graduating class when we talk about the class of 2025 and whether or not they will be ready and equipped to face their future. This personal perspective hit home for me. I want to help prepare this next generation for academic success and to equip for service in God’s world as ‘salt and light’ (Matt 5:13-16). We are working together here for children like my own.

Alternatives to YouTube

I attended a webinar earlier today that focused on a framework for technology integration in teaching. A question was asked regarding YouTube alternatives, especially since many schools continue to block YouTube in the classroom. I recall my post that highlighted YouTube’s efforts to address this, however I appreciated learning about other options to consider, especially those that categorize videos by subject area. 47 Alternatives to Using YouTube in the Classroom and WatchKnowLearn.org offers a number of additional good resources for teachers to consider.

YouTube for the classroom

Numerous teaching and learning blogs announced the big news today that YouTube is beginning to offer an education-only site of videos appropriate for use in the classroom. This site will  1) disable all comments (so there will be no distraction from other viewers’ inappropriate comments), 2) offer only related videos on topic as suggestions of similar videos (no content will be suggested that can distract students from learning), and 3) “beef up” its K-12 content, much of which will be aligned to the Common Core Standards.

In addition YouTube also reported partnering with education content-creators by investing in 100 channels that will produce original material exclusive to YouTube. This material will not be available on other video sites.

Schools need to sign up to access this service in order to receive an authentication key that will allow them to modify the YouTube URL address for the videos.

Additional advantages of this initiative include:

  • School network settings can now allow teachers and students the ability to access hundreds of thousands of free educational and learning videos while still filtering access to the general YouTube site.
  • School administrators and teachers can log in to watch any video in order to customize the content available in their school.
  • Hundreds of playlists of videos  organized by subject and grade have been developed by YouTube. These playlists can help teachers spend less time searching for the “right” video.
  • In addition, teachers can create their own playlists of videos that are viewable only within their school’s network.
  • Students cannot log in to the general YouTube site. They can only watch YouTube EDU videos plus videos their school has added.
  • All comments and related videos are disabled. Search features are limited to YouTube EDU videos.
 Some useful resources:

Video presentation on this initiative

YouTube for school

YouTube.com/education

YouTube’s Teacher’s channel – to learn how to use videos in the classroom

YouTube playlists

TED education channel

Suggestions of other videos from education organizations can also be found here.

 

More discussion and resources on developing financial literacy at high school

I have been surprised at the number of resources I finding on the topic of financial literacy. I came across this post from a teacher who actually teaches financial literacy courses in the high school. His list of resources need to be bookmarked as valuable references. For example:

FinLitTV 

TeenDollars.org

The Stock Market Game

The budget challenge simulation

Awesome Island” game focusing on decision making, credit, debit, money management, insurance, investing, etc. Everfi offers similar simulations.

The idea of an entrepreneurship class is another new one that I hadn’t thought of before, but it certainly is intriguing and could be a real-life application of coursework, too!

The need to develop media literacy

“We no longer live solely in a print-centric world” (Baker, 2010, p. 133). We all have access to the Internet, television, music, images, movies and other emerging technologies. While this seems so evident, why is that schools often fail to help students foster the necessary critical skills that will help them properly access this media? This represents a key 21st century fluency: media literacy.

The 21st Century Fluency Project notes that media literacy is an important fluency that encompasses two components:

1) The ability to look analytically at any communication media to interpret the real message, how the chosen media is being used to shape thinking, and evaluate the efficacy of the message.

2) The ability to create and publish original digital products, matching the media to the intended message by determining the most appropriate and effective media for that message.

I am learning that teachers need to be proactive in teaching media literacy skills. Instructional recommendations suggest that this should not be a separate class, but a topic that is integrated across the curriculum. Media literacy instruction should includes lots of hands-on experiential learning to assist students as they encounter media in their research and daily lives. Through authentic exposure to various forms if media, students are offered the opportunity to develop this set of skills. This can take place as part of individual reflective work or in cooperative group settings.

Baker (2010) notes that goals of media literacy instruction are “to create critical thinkers and viewers who have the skills, knowledge, and abilities necessary to understand, analyze, and create media messages, as well as to comprehend their purpose and audiences” (p. 143). He offers a number of interesting classroom applications across the curriculum. It will be worth returning to this chapter again.

It is important, however, that we provide the necessary professional development to support teachers as they engage students on this necessary fluency.

Reference
Baker, F. W. (2010). Media literacy: 21st century literacy skills. In H. Hayes Jacobs (Ed.) Curriculum 21: Essential education for a changing world, (133-152). Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

http://www.fluency21.com

The call for financial literacy instruction

An interesting news item: The Education Secretary has started encouraging the President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability to consider recommending that financial literacy instruction be integrated into the K-12 curriculum. Rather than only a high school elective, Secretary Duncan has even suggested that this be a core subject that students may experience in the lower grades.

President Obama convened the council to help people understand financial matters and make responsible financial decisions. This was made evident during the “Great Recession” as far too many people appear to lack the essential financial planning skills to handle their money wisely and invest responsibly for their future.

In addition to the more traditional topics of budgeting, personal finances, credit and loans, Secretary Duncan noted that a financial literacy curriculum could include topics such as the stock market, investing,  and retirement planning.

As Corbin (2011) notes, overall teacher preparedness for instruction in this area may be an issue. This highlights the need to instructioanlly support all teachers with the curricular and instructional demands that they face in the classroom.

Reference:

Corbin, K. (2011, Nov. 8). Education secretary appeals for financial literacy, planning instruction in schools. Accessed November 9, 2011 through onwallstreet.com.

The 100 best Web 2.0 classroom tools

I came across this list of the 100 best Web 2.0 classroom tools as voted by teachers in the field. There are some really good resources in this list, many of which I had never heard before. Some of the tools might be less appropriate for the classroom (i.e. PayPal?), and there are many that may one day become indispensable. What is nice is that each tool is linked to its host site for further exploration.

It is interesting how I found this site, as I was researching Glogster and this list was linked to the site . Glogster is an online poster maker. What is attractive about “glogs” is that students can include text, audio, video, pictures, and more to make the poster quite interactive. In this way, glogs can further engage kinesthetic, visual, and auditory learners. In some ways Glogster is a more robust companion to Wordle, which focuses only on beautiful ‘word clouds’.

 

Financial literacy instruction remains important

I discussed the “case for financial literacy instruction” a few months back. Today, I came across some additional resources that may be helpful regarding this important recommendation. Adams (2011) noted that the possibility of accumulating student debt in college during these difficult times is pushing students to learn more about financial literacy. There are currently four states that mandate a financial literacy graduation requirement, and 19 additional states have integrated financial education into their high school curriculum. There is no such requirement in the state of Washington, but this is important enough an issue for student development and stewardship that I have been watching for financial literacy electives when reviewing possible online providers. I am also learning that there are numerous free resources available to help supplement a class curriculum on this topic, including Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy , National Endowment for Financial Education , National Foundation for Credit Counseling and the US Mint.

Reference:

Adams, C. J. (2011, Oct. 28) High schools, colleges push financial literacy. Accessed Nov. 2, 2011 through Education Week.

http://www.orangekids.com/teacher/additional-resources-literacy.aspx