Needed: A focus on teaching and learning

The success of any 1-1 implementation lies less in the choice of computing device, but more in the difference that it can contribute to the overall teaching and learning that is taking place in the classroom. This is so important to remember, especially as more and more schools follow through with an “iPad initiative.”

While the selection of educational apps is vast (the Apple in Education website currently reads “Thousands of apps. Endless potential.”), I have come to understand that teachers shouldn’t focus only on the apps that can help with learning (intriguing as they may be). The key is to expand student thinking, not restrict it by working only within a choice selection of apps.

Appropriate instructional decisions are needed in order to take student learning to the next level. How are teachers challenging student thinking and inviting them to use their device in productive ways that will help them learn better? To what extent are students using the technology to curate their knowledge, collaborate with others, and create their own content? These are two important questions to keep in mind before deciding on an “app for that.”

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The “flipped” classroom

The notion of a “flipped” classroom has been gaining a lot of attention in the past year or so.

First of all, what is a “flipped” classroom? By most accounts, a flipped classroom is one where the instruction takes place online outside of class hours, thereby freeing classtime for discussion, application and/or homework on the online lesson’s ideas and topics that students have previously viewed.

I have been following the development and interest that it is gaining and wanted to collect a number of links to some valuable resources on the flipped model:

This infographic provides a nice overview of the flipped model.

A collection of 10 reasons to consider flipping a classroom countered with 5 reasons not to flip a classroom.

A balanced commentary on the flipped classroom model for learning.

The flipped class manifest outlines the core tenets of a flipped classroom.

A discussion on how the flipped classroom is radically transforming learning.

The Flipped Class Network is a professional learning community to support teachers as they consider flipping a lesson or even their entire class.

Alternatives to YouTube

I attended a webinar earlier today that focused on a framework for technology integration in teaching. A question was asked regarding YouTube alternatives, especially since many schools continue to block YouTube in the classroom. I recall my post that highlighted YouTube’s efforts to address this, however I appreciated learning about other options to consider, especially those that categorize videos by subject area. 47 Alternatives to Using YouTube in the Classroom and WatchKnowLearn.org offers a number of additional good resources for teachers to consider.

A reminder for an e-school day

A winter storm arrived last weekend, and it promises to keep schools closed for the better part of this week. I was reminded of my post last April on how a hybrid approach to teaching in the classroom could keep the students learning, even during the days that schools “have” to be closed. Offering an opportunity for a synchronous discussion on a topic, or even a video chat, and then following through on some collaborative work online could keep students engaged, even after they have played in the snow.

More discussion and resources on developing financial literacy at high school

I have been surprised at the number of resources I finding on the topic of financial literacy. I came across this post from a teacher who actually teaches financial literacy courses in the high school. His list of resources need to be bookmarked as valuable references. For example:

FinLitTV 

TeenDollars.org

The Stock Market Game

The budget challenge simulation

Awesome Island” game focusing on decision making, credit, debit, money management, insurance, investing, etc. Everfi offers similar simulations.

The idea of an entrepreneurship class is another new one that I hadn’t thought of before, but it certainly is intriguing and could be a real-life application of coursework, too!

Acknowledging certain limitations of the iPad in the classroom

Here are two articles written by the same author attempting to answer the questions: Will iPads replace backpacks? and Will the iPad replace the simplicity and convenience of paper products for higher-level learning tasks?

I like how Ledesma addresses both questions and highlights numerous advantages in using an iPad. For example:

  • An iPad is great tool for research on the Internet and other consumption of web-based media.
  • Most desktop computing can be completed using an iPad.
  • It is possible to access and/or synchronize your files through the iPad.
  • Real-time communication (chat, email, voice) is possible with the iPad.

However, he does acknowledge that there are limitations in screen size and in the ability to access multiple sources easily when using the iPad for certain work.

“Unfortunately, higher-level work, which requires deeper analysis and simultaneous access between multiple sources, may be more than what a single device and small screen can handle.” (2010)

“Technology should make the learning process easier, not harder or more complicated.” (2011)

So, it may seem that students will continue to use their backpacks as they carry around their books, pens and paper which will still be needed for the more academic, higher-order learning tasks.

“Enjoy the iPads for what they are best at, and let’s stop trying to force them to replace tools that they shouldn’t.” (2011)

Reference:

Ledesma, P. (2010, Sept. 14). Schooled on my iPad. Accessed through Education Week Teacher, Nov. 15, 2011.

Ledesma, P. (2011, Nov. 14). iPads in schools: Replacing backpacks? Accessed through Education Week Teacher, Nov. 15, 2011.

Digital textbooks for the classroom

I recall a conversation when I learned that one of the larger annual expenditures for MCS is on textbooks. This can change with access to digital textbooks. They are on average 53% cheaper to develop and print, and this is a savings that can be passed on to the school. Equally important is the stewardship of natural resources that is involved with the publication of these texts. From a student’s immediate perspective, such texts are significantly lighter to carry around and they provide immediate 24/7 access to the materials. This infographic highlights the textbooks of tomorrow.

Virtual texts are becoming more and more interactive, and this is impacting the learning experience for students. An example that I came across was the HMH Fuse interactive text for algebra and geometry. These texts allow students to interact with the material, and include video tutorials, “scratch pads” to actually work out math problems or make notes, animated guidance in error analysis, and hyperlink access to glossaries. Books may embed games as part of the text process and inline quizzes to help students gauge their progress on the material. Texts such as these are immediately accessible and can include syncing features that allow the teachers to access assessment data on student progress from the books. This video highlights the student’s experience with such a text (I admit that this is a promotional video developed by the publisher, but it does suggest how students can take to such an interactive text).

Another version of the virtual text is one that is custom designed and created in-house. When teachers have the time and desire, it is possible to self-publish a text that meets local needs and remains completing aligned to learning standards. This article describes one school in Minnesota that accomplished just this. Their budget crisis served to motivate a group of teachers to develop a text and supporting videos for their subject area.

Reference:

Oseland, C. (2011, Sept. 28). Budget crisis inspires award winning curriculum redesign at Byron Senior High School. THE Journal, accessed Nov. 14, 2011.